Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Thailand and SE Asia’s first Pint of Science Festival kicked Pint-of-Science1 off on Mon 15 May with a look at Killer Bugs: Disease, Detection and Destruction and an enthusiastic reception from over 50 attendees that included scientists from MORU and other institutions, business people with a background in science and students.

Hosted by MORU’s Phaik Yeong Cheah and Sandy Sachaphimukh, the sold-out evening featured lively presentations from MORU’s Markus Winterberg (Applied Proteomics: A Short Story of Cake and Urine); LOMWRU’S Matt Robinson (Bac Chat) and Direk Limmathurotsakul, who spoke on his initiative, Antibiotic Footprint in Thailand. The evening’s discussions ranged from how monks bless a mass-spectrometer and the amount of antibiotics fed to chickens in Thailand to a how a bacterium named Bob makes decisions.

Held 15-17 May at FabCafé Bangkok and open to all, Pint of Science Thailand gave the public and participating scientists a chance to meet and directly engage with each other on a variety of topics in a lively, informative manner in both English and Thai.

Presenters at first Pint of Science Thailand: MORU's Dr Markus Winterberg, Dr Matt Robinson and Dr Direk Limmathurotsakul. © MORU 2017 photos Nicky Almasy.

Despite the sudden rain storm just before kick-off, FabCafé was once again jam-packed Tues 16 May as Olivo Miotto hosted the 2nd evening, The Hidden Secrets of Epidemics and Evolution.

Noel Hidalgo Tan of SEAMEO SPAFA kicked off the evening with Crouching Tiger, Hidden Elephants: The unseen cave paintings of Southeast Asia, a 'Buddhas versus elephants' guessing game and a story of hidden cave art in South-East Asia.

Noel was followed by MORU MAEMOD’s Wirichada (Pan) Pan-ngum and Lisa White‘s The Outbreak Breakout, a hands-on disease modelling exercise that everyone joined in. Mahidol’s Narupat Hongdilokkul closed the night with Evolution Director, a look at how evolution works.

On Wed 17 May, LOMWRU’s Matt Robinson MC’d the final Pint of Science Thailand evening, Tackling Diseases of the Past and Present. Well received and another full house, the evening included the Identify the famous scientist game – and 2 lucky winners who got to take home the much-coveted limited edited Pint of Science Thailand T-shirt.

Jittiporn Chaisaingmongkol of the Chulaborn Research Institute led off with Precision Medicine in Cancer: How to Make your Gene Talk, a look at personalised medicine for cancer treatment. MORU’s Bipin Adhikari followed with his history, Leprosy: Discovered by a Norwegian, Still Causing Problems Today. With a little help from Marvin Gaye, Andrea Rücker of MORU closed with The Sex Lives of Malaria Parasites.

Much fun was had by all, with many sad to see the end of a fruitful and entertaining festival.

Similar stories

Arjen Dondorp, Peter Horby and Rose McGready elected Academy of Medical Sciences Fellows

Awards & Appointments MORU Bangkok SMRU

"Although it is hard to look beyond the pandemic right now," says President of the Academy of Medical Sciences Professor Dame Anne Johnson, "I want to stress how important it is that the Academy Fellowship represents the widest diversity of biomedical and health sciences. The greatest health advances rely on the findings of many types of research, and on multidisciplinary teams and cross-sector and global collaboration."

Pint of Science Thailand is back

MORU Bangkok Public Engagement

Live and on-line from Bangkok! Be ready for Thursday 13th May, when Pint of Science Thailand will stream live from Bangkok. Join us via Facebook, YouTube or right here from the Pint of Science Thailand website as we journey from bacterial infections to viruses, discover how clinical trials work, and how scientific development is seen in the eyes of the law!

Innovative strategies for engaging communities with malaria research

MORU Bangkok Public Engagement

For World Malaria Day 2021, F1000 Research Blog spoke to Professor Phaik Yeong Cheah about her research focussed on drama and arts-based community engagement for malaria research, published with Wellcome Open Research.

New project’s child-appropriate primaquine doses could have significant impact on global burden of malaria

MORU Bangkok

On Sunday 25 April, World Malaria Day, the Developing Paediatric Primaquine (DPP) project will launch its website. DPP will produce children-appropriate primaquine doses that could both cut malaria deaths in vulnerable African children by blocking transmission of P. falciparum malaria and reduce P. vivax malaria more widely.

Researchers call for access to Ivermectin for young children

MORU Bangkok Publication Research

Millions of children weighing less than 15kg are currently denied access to Ivermectin treatment due to insufficient safety data being available to support a change to the current label indication. The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network’s new meta-analysis provides evidence that supports removing this barrier and improving treatment equity.

New report highlights growing concern of vaccine falsification

MORU Bangkok

The Medicine Quality Research Group has published a new Medical Product Quality Report focussing on increasing issues around substandard and falsified (SF) COVID-19 vaccines. With the implementation of the key innovations of COVID-19 vaccines, there have been growing numbers of reports of SF vaccines in the public domain. Given the vital role they will play in ending the pandemic and protecting the global population but severe issues with equitable access, SF vaccines are highly likely to be a growing problem.