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On 10 May 2018, SMRU Deputy Director Rose McGready was awarded the Alumni Award for Service to Humanity by the University of Sydney. The Alumni Award recognizes the personal contribution of alumni who, through service to philanthropy, improve the lives of those in need. It also seeks to recognize the significant involvement of Sydney alumni in projects that enrich local or international communities.

Rose McGready

In in her acceptance speech, Rose thanked the Karen community and colleagues at SMRU: “The Karen community on the Thailand Myanmar Border are the true recipients of the award. I have been shown more humanity and generosity by refugees and migrants living in marginalized communities than I can ever hope to give.

“The chance for higher education [on the border] is close to zero. Yet incredible resilience amongst the communities has built up a cadre of under-recognised health professionals who are on the pathway to eliminating malaria. Their work at Shoklo Malaria Research Unit has been pivotal to the way we treat malaria today. And their care of moms and babies has significantly impacted maternal and new-born mortality.“

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