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On 17 Nov, the Pakistan arm of COPCOV enrolled its first participant at Aga Khan University (AKU), Karachi, as COPCOV Pakistan PI Prof. M. Asim Beg looked on. Prof. Beg will be supported by AKU’s Drs Farah Qamar, Faisal Mahmood, Noshin Nasir, Momin Qazi, Sonia Qureshi and Najia Ghanchi as well as Prof. Saeed Hamid, director of AKU’s Clinical Trials Unit.

Pakistan Principal Investigator Prof. M. Asim Beg and two colleagues in a hospital setting.

Pakistan joins Thailand and COPCOV UK sites in participating in COPCOV, the MORU-led, Oxford-supported global study to test if hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine can prevent COVID-19 in healthcare workers. AKU expects to enrol 400 participants, with new COPCOV sites in Indonesia and Kenya expected to begin enrolment in late Nov-early Dec.

Send us an enquiry if you are interested in setting up a COPCOV clinical study site in your country.

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