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Progress against malaria has stalled, and the disease remains a significant threat to billions of people despite the expensive, decades-long efforts to contain it. In an encouraging development, MORU reported complete success in curing hundreds of patients in Southeast Asia with new three-drug combinations mixing fast-acting artemisinin with two longer-lasting drugs. It it hoped that triple therapy should become the standard for malaria treatment.

Mother under a cloth © Jane Hahn for The Washington Post, via Getty Images

A mother mours her six-month-old daughter in Banki, Nigeria, who succumbed to malaria. Nigeria has a quarter of all the world’s malaria cases.

The full story is available on The New York Times website

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New study uses isotope ratio mass spectrometry to analyse origins of falsified antimalarials

New work from the Medicine Quality Group at IDDO and MORU pilots the use of stable isotope mass spectrometry to estimate where falsified antimalarials and their components come from. The study, published in Scientific Reports, is a collaboration between the Medicine Quality Research Group, LOMWRU, and MORU Bangkok, working with stable isotope scientists in Utah, USA.