Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

IDDO and MORU released its Medicine Quality Scientific Literature Surveyor. The surveyor delivers summaries of published scientific reports on the quality of the classes of essential medicines listed below, across regions and over time. We hope it will help medicine regulators, scientists, health professionals, purchasers and officials fill critical information gaps.

Africa and Asia map with pins showing publications location

Substandard and falsified (SF) medical products (medicines, vaccines, diagnostic tests and devices) pose an immediate danger to many people worldwide, and in the case of anti-infectives, they could also increase the threat of drug resistance emerging and spreading. A major challenge in preventing this is a lack of accessible and reliable information on how widespread they really are. This new mapping tool visualises these data and it will help scientists, health professionals and officials fill critical information gaps. 

Funded by Wellcome, the tool delivers summaries of published scientific reports on the quality of communicable diseases (antimalarials, antiretrovirals, antibiotics, anti-tuberculosis) non-communicable diseases (antidiabetics and medical devices for diabetes management, cardiovascular medicines and medical devices), veterinary medicines, and vaccines across regions and over time, both in English and French.

It builds on the success of the Medicine Quality team’s work on WWARN’s existing Antimalarial Surveyor and future phased releases are planned that will expand its reach to other medical products.  

With increasing number of reports in the scientific literature of substandard and falsified medical products for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of COVID-19 we are developing a Surveyor database and map for these, including past reports of SF medicines being repurposed for COVID-19.

Read more on the IDDO website

Similar stories

Constant genetic surveillance necessary to keep multidrug-resistant malaria parasite strains in check, study finds

Continually monitoring malaria parasite populations is necessary to prevent outbreaks of previously dormant multidrug-resistant malaria strains, say University of Oxford researchers. Multidrug-resistant malaria parasite strains can rapidly grow or collapse in response to public health policy changes, say the researchers in a study published today in The Lancet.

Bacterial infections linked to one in eight global deaths, according to GRAM study

Data showing 7.7 million deaths from 33 bacterial infections can guide measures to strengthen health systems, particularly in low-income settings

Enhanced vaccination against Japanese encephalitis virus could reduce encephalitis prevalence by one third in SE Asia

Encephalitis is a worldwide public health issue, with a substantially high burden among children in Southeast Asia. A large study of the causes of childhood encephalitis in SE Asia suggests that enhanced and effective vaccination against the Japanese encephalitis virus alone could reduce encephalitis prevalence by one third.

Laos’ first Pint of Science: warty newts, COVID, AI for Instagram, and more!

Organised by a grass-root community of thousands of scientists across the world, Pint of Science 2022 allows researchers in 25 countries and over 800 cities to share their latest findings with lay folk in interesting, informal settings. Lao PDR joined the global Pint of Science family on Monday 9 May, when the first-ever Pint of Science Laos kicked off!

Largest-ever IPD meta-analysis of malaria patients to inform haemoglobin changes

A new malaria study using a very large analysis of pooled individual patient data (IPD) from more than 70,000 patients of all ages, has been published in BMC Medicine by the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network Falciparum Haematology Study Group

Lack of evidence is key barrier to using portable devices to detect poor quality medicines

A series of papers which reviewed portable devices to detect poor quality medicines has concluded major gaps in scientific evidence remain a key barrier for regulators to implement surveillance systems using such devices.