Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Organised by a grass-root community of thousands of scientists across the world, Pint of Science 2022 allowed researchers in 25 countries and over 800 cities to share their latest findings with lay folk in interesting, informal settings. Lao PDR joined the global Pint of Science family on Monday 9 May, when the first-ever Pint of Science Laos kicked off!

Collage of photos taken during Pint of Science presentation in Vientiane, Laos PDR in May 2022

Laos joined the global Pint of Science family on Monday 9 May, when the first-ever Pint of Science Laos kicked off in Vientiane! 

Hats off to the Pint of Science Laos Team: Tamalee Roberts, Kaisone Padith, Vayouly Vidhamaly, Padthana Kiedsathid, Aphaphone Adsamouth, Latsaniphone Boutthasavong, Manophab Luangraj, and Bountoy Sibounheuang!

Led by LOMWRU’s Matt Robinson, the Pint of Science Laos team put together a full 2-day programme at Scipresso, Vientiane's only science-themed café. Hosted by Matt and Kaisone, the first night, Mon 9 May, saw talks on artificial intelligence and its use on Instagram beauty influencers, the life of the Lao warty newt, and we discovered what life is really like for a pathologist at the Cancer Center, Mittaphab Hospital. The second evening, Tues 10 May, hosted by Vilada Chansamouth and Latsaniphone, featured talks on biodiversity in the Mekong region, COVID-19 in Laos, and disease transmission by animals. A fun and entertaining time was had by all!

This year, Pint of Science is being held in 25 countries, and over 800 cities, between 9-11 May. We hope that Pint of Science Thailand will be able to go ahead very soon. No dates are set as yet, but we will announce it when possible.

 - Text and photos courtesy of Matt Robinson.

Similar stories

Largest-ever IPD meta-analysis of malaria patients to inform haemoglobin changes

A new malaria study using a very large analysis of pooled individual patient data (IPD) from more than 70,000 patients of all ages, has been published in BMC Medicine by the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network Falciparum Haematology Study Group

Lack of evidence is key barrier to using portable devices to detect poor quality medicines

A series of papers which reviewed portable devices to detect poor quality medicines has concluded major gaps in scientific evidence remain a key barrier for regulators to implement surveillance systems using such devices.

New study alerts to the risk of poor quality medicines used to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease

There are important but neglected issues with substandard and falsified medicines and medical products used to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. From limited available data, MORU and IDDO scientists found about one fifth of medicines reported as sampled in the literature were substandard or falsified. This systematic review suggests that more and better quality data and data sharing are needed to better understand the global burden of this problem and inform interventions.

FIEBRE Laos concludes recruitment

Congratulations to everyone involved in contributing to FIEBRE’s success - the clinical and laboratory staff, hospital, participants and local communities. The team has continued working throughout the COVID-19 epidemic despite national restrictions which slowed down enrolment and limited field activities.

Congratulations new NDM professors

The University of Oxford has awarded CTMGH two new Professors. Elisabeth Ashley - UK-trained physician who specialises in infectious diseases and medical microbiology & virology, and Director of the Lao-Oxford-Mahosot Hospital-Wellcome Trust Research Unit (LOMWRU) in Lao PDR since 2019, Liz is conferred the title of Professor of Tropical Medicine. Stuart Blacksell - Senior Research Scientist based at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU) in Thailand, Stuart is conferred the title of Professor of Tropical Microbiology.

Large scale systematic review details causes of non-malarial febrile illnesses globally and identifies research priorities

A series of articles that set out to explore the global distribution of infections that cause non-malarial febrile illness has been published in BMC Medicine. The series brings together the results of large-scale systematic reviews of the causes of fever in Africa, Latin America, and Southern and South-Eastern Asia, and has helped identify major knowledge gaps, geographical differences, priority areas for diagnostics research and development, and enabled the most comprehensive systematic review of literature to date.