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The manufacture and distribution of medicines is a global industry, tainted by fake and substandard products. Not only might these drugs not work as expected, but some are even contributing to antimicrobial resistance. So, what’s in your medicine cabinet? This is an article on Mosaic, a Wellcome publication

Drawing: a box of tablets and bottles © © Thomas Hedger at Grand Matter for Mosaic

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