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ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to explore the mortality pattern due to Gorkha earthquakes in 2015 and review the response and recovery efforts immediately following the earthquakes.MethodsData from published reports of the Nepal Police showed over 8000 deaths. These death counts were categorized by gender, ethnicity, and age groups (interval of 5 years). The mortality rate was calculated (per 100 000 population), using the projected population as the denominator as of April 2015.ResultsChildren < 10 years and older adults > 55 years showed a higher rate of deaths, with similar trends for the most affected districts. Almost 8 more females' deaths were reported per 100 000 population compared with their male counterparts. There was a higher death rate from Province 3 with a notable gender difference: Nearly 20 more females' deaths were reported per 100 000 population compared with their male counterparts. There was a higher death rate in mountains (542.4 per 100 000) compared with hills (55.0 per 100 000) and the southern Terai region (0.96 per 100 000) of Nepal.ConclusionsYoung and older adults, female, and residents of remote, mountainous regions of Nepal were vulnerable to the earthquakes. Future earthquake preparedness should focus on the vulnerable population by age and gender and the geographical accessibility.

Original publication

DOI

10.1017/dmp.2020.12

Type

Journal article

Journal

Disaster medicine and public health preparedness

Publication Date

02/2021

Volume

15

Pages

127 - 133

Addresses

Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Keywords

Humans, Retrospective Studies, Sex Factors, Aged, Child, Child, Preschool, Nepal, Female, Male, Earthquakes