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MORU and SMRU were delighted and honoured to host the University of Oxford Vice-Chancellor Prof Louise Richardson and her party during her visit to Thailand on 1-4 September. Accompanying the Vice-Chancellor were Jeremy Woodall (Director of Development (Asia)), Frewyeni Kidane (Fundraiser for Southeast Asia), Cher Wu (Asia Development office) and Ed Gibbs (NDM Director of Finance and Operations).

Group photo of Vice-Chancellor Louise Richardson visiting MORU and SMRU

After landing in Bangkok on 1 Sept, the visitors flew to Mae Sot where they met with key staff from the SMRU programme. On 2 Sept, they visited the Wangpa Clinic, meeting with SMRU staff including midwives and local physicians, then went on to the SMRU offices in Mae Sod where they met office and laboratory researchers.

At the Faculty of Tropical Medicine on Tues 3r Sept, Vice-Chancellor Prof Richardson, Mr Woodall, Ms Kidane, Ms Wu and Mr Gibbs were welcomed by the Faculty Dean, Assoc Prof Pratap Singhasivanon. They then went on a tour of MORU departments and laboratories, meeting and chatting to many MORU and Faculty staff members. The visit was rounded off with a fantastic lunch hosted by the Dean and attended by many Faculty of Tropical Medicine Ajarns.

The following day Prof Richardson visited the Mahidol University campus at Salaya, meeting Prof Banchong Mahaisavariya, Acting President of Mahidol, and other senior Mahidol academics and discussing potential areas of collaboration between the two universities.”

- Text by Nick Day, with thanks to Rose McGready, Primprapaporn (Prim) Thongdee, Pawinee (Joy) Pawthong and David Burton for photos

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