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Two researchers from the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health were awarded medals by the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene at the 2019 European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health. Professor David Warrell was awarded the Sir Patrick Manson Medal, and Dr Samson Kinyanjui the Chalmers Medal.

David Warrell with a Mason medal, and Samson Kinyanjui with a Chalmers medal

Professor David Warrell received the highly regarded Manson Medal, the highest prize of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine, awarded triennially, in recognition to his lifelong work in tropical medicine, notably on malaria, snakebites and rabies. Professor Warrel not only founded the Centre for Tropical Medicine in Oxford, he started the research at the Mahidol Oxford Research Unit in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1979. His research at MORU revolutionised the treatment of severe malaria.
Professor Warrell shares the 2019 Manson Medal with Professor Janet Hemingway from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. Previous award winners include Nick White (2010) and David Weatherall (1998).

Dr Samson Kinyanjui received the Chalmers Medal, awarded to researchers in tropical medicine or international health who obtained their last relevant qualification between 15 and 20 years ago. Dr Kinyanjui received this award in recognition to his work in capacity building and training of scientists in Kenya. Dr Kinyanjui is the Head of IDeAL, the Initiative to Develop African Research Leaders. IDeAL strives to attract young Africans to research and has trained 800 African researchers to date.
Previous award winners include Philip Bejon (2014), Mike English (2008), Nick Day (2006), François Nosten (2002), Bob Snow (1999), Kevin Marsh (1994), Nick White (1993) and David Warrell (1981).

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