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We are delighted to announce that several MORU Network colleagues were honoured in the recent University of Oxford Recognition of Distinction rounds. Clockwise from top left: Joel Tarning was awarded the title of Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Lisa White Professor of Modelling and Epidemiology. Stuart Blacksell, Susanna Dunachie, Paul Turner, Richard Maude, Frank Smithuis and Phaik Yeong Cheah were each awarded the title of Associate Professor.

Joel Tarning, Lisa White, Stuart Blacksell, Susie Dunachie, Phaik Yeong Cheah, Frank Smithuis, Richard Maude and Paul Turner

We are delighted to announce that several MORU Network colleagues were honoured in the recent University of Oxford Recognition of Distinction rounds. Clockwise from top leftJoel Tarning was awarded the title of Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Lisa White Professor of Modelling and Epidemiology. Stuart BlacksellSusanna DunachiePaul TurnerRichard MaudeFrank Smithuis and Phaik Yeong Cheah were each awarded the title of Associate Professor.

In addition, two colleagues at LOMWRU, MORU’s Lao PDR unit, received significant recognition for their work: David Dance, LOMWRU’s Clinical Research Microbiologist and Unit Safety Officer, was made Honorary Professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and Dr Minivan Vongsouvath, Deputy Director of LOMWRU’s Microbiology Lab and Deputy Head of Virology, was recently awarded her MSc in Clinical Tropical Medicine from Mahidol University.

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