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In the next few months, the first Phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trials – the majority of them in upper-middle or high-income countries and in specific target populations like young adults – will report their results. How relevant will their study results be for low-resource settings?

Headshots of webinar speakers Rebecca Kahn, Rebecca Grais, Cherry Kang and James Watson

On 27 Oct, the COVID-19 Clinical Research Coalition (hosted by DNDi) and MORU co-organized an online webinar panel, Applicability of COVID-19 vaccine trial results to low- and middle-income countries. Moderator Dr James Watson (MORU) and a panel of speakers examined whether criteria relevant for low- and middle-income countries have been taken into account when planning these studies and in determining how to define a “successful” vaccine.

The speakers and their topics in the Applicability of COVID-19 vaccine trial results to low-and-middle-income countries webinar are: 

Designing & interpreting vaccine trials for epidemics with mild and asymptomatic infections, Dr Rebecca Kahn, Harvard University, USA

Trialing vaccines in outbreaks and crises: some lessons learned, Dr Rebecca Grais, Epicentre, France

The impact of trial design on vaccine uptake: Regulatory approval, vaccine acceptability and other issues, Prof. Gagandeep Kang, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India & Steering Committee Member of the COVID-19 Clinical Research Coalition.

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