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Which infections are most common in the Chiangrai region? How should we treat them and how can we improve diagnostic? Which strategies are most effective in directing antibiotic treatment? Blog by Carlo Perrone, research physician based at the Chiang Rai Clinical Research Unit in Chiangrai, Thailand.

Chiangrai Clinical Research Unit Team, with from left to right: Nipaphan Kanthawang (Bee), Nidanuch Tasak (Pui), Carlo Perrone, Nongyao Khatta (Ann), Ploypatcha Kaewwiset (Maew), Areerat Thaiprakong (Zulin). They stand in front of a banner that says Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital (in Thai as well, first row) and Office of the permanent Secretary of Public Health (second row); Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital (third row)

Researchers at CCRU have studied the epidemiology of undifferentiated febrile illnesses in the region, and are now conducting a randomised trial to find out how to best treat scrub typhus. This and other studies will gather important information on diagnostics and pathophysiological disease features.

We are engaging with community health workers and community health volunteers to raise the awareness of scrub typhus and reduce its burden. A previous project focused on antibiotic usage in primary care units. This information, together with the results of the GRAM project, will help identify areas in which improvement can be made and help to plan future antibiotic stewardship interventions.

The full story is available on the BDI website

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