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"Although it is hard to look beyond the pandemic right now," says President of the Academy of Medical Sciences Professor Dame Anne Johnson, "I want to stress how important it is that the Academy Fellowship represents the widest diversity of biomedical and health sciences. The greatest health advances rely on the findings of many types of research, and on multidisciplinary teams and cross-sector and global collaboration."

Arjen Dondorp, Rose McGready and Peter Horby

All new Fellows were selected for their exceptional contributions to the advancement of medical science through innovative research discoveries and translating scientific developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.

  • For his pioneering work in the pathophysiology and treatment of severe malaria, antimalarial drug resistance and improvement of intensive care practice in resource-limited settings, Professor Arjen Dondorp of the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health (Nuffield Department of Medicine) becomes a Fellow. He led large multinational trials in Asia and Africa that demonstrated parenteral artesunate is superior to quinine in preventing death from severe malaria in both adults and children. He also organised the pivotal trials showing that artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria had emerged on the Cambodian-Thai border, starting an extensive research programme on multidrug resistant malaria, an important threat to malaria control.
  • For his tireless clinical and epidemiological research on a wide range of emerging and epidemic infections spanning over 15 years, Professor Peter Horby of the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health (Nuffield Department of Medicine) is named a Fellow at the Academy. He is co-lead of the RECOVERY trial – the world's largest trial of COVID-19 treatments – as well as director of Epidemic Diseases Research Group Oxford (ERGO) and International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC), which are both engaged in several international programmes of clinical and epidemiological research to prepare for and respond to emerging infections that may develop into epidemics or pandemics.
  • Professor Rose McGready of the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health (Nuffield Department of Medicine) is named a Fellow for her leadership of the maternal malaria research sphere. During her tenure at the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit on the Thailand-Myanmar border, she has provided detailed knowledge of the burden and effects of malaria infections on pregnant women and new-borns, leading the world in the safe use of artemisinin derivatives in pregnancy. Focussing on maternal and child health, her research work has been translated into clinical practice and resulted in dramatic improvements in the health of marginalized women in South East Asia and beyond.

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

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