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The International Day of Women and Girls in Science recognises and celebrates the critical role played by women but also aims to promote their full and equal access to participation in science. However, despite more women than ever working across the sciences, it is still a male-dominated field with only 30% of female researchers, according to UNESCO. IDDO asked colleagues across their networks for their views. How we could encourage more women into science? And what changes are needed in order to keep them in science?

Dr Corine Karema, Gloria Mason, Dr Fabiana Barreira and Dr Chinwe Lucia Ochu
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