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The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) has been shortlisted for a 2017 Times Higher Education (THE) Award in the ‘International Collaboration of the Year’ category.

THE awards nomination Sept 2017 poster

Known as the ‘Oscars of higher education’, the THE Awards recognise “the talent, dedication and innovation of individuals and teams across all aspects of university life”. The ‘International Collaboration of the Year’ category acknowledges “exceptional projects carried out jointly between a UK institution and one or more international partners”.

WWARN is a collaborative research network that works to provide the information necessary to optimise antimalarial treatments, in turn, reducing the number of people falling ill and dying from malaria. WWARN works with over 260 collaborators across the world. The Network is part of the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO) (link is external), based at the University of Oxford.

The nomination recognises the results of two research projects that have led to international policy changes to help improve the outcomes of those treated with an important antimalarial medicine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP).

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