Latest News

Meet our researchers - Rob van der Pluijm: Tracking artemisinin resistance

Meet our researchers - Rob van der Pluijm: Tracking artemisinin resistance

Posted 20/06/2018

Anti-malaria drug resistance is spreading throughout Southeast Asia and we need to find new treatments. Our researchers at MORU use a combination of artemisinin and two partner drugs instead of one. If confirmed safe and tolerable, triple artemisinin combination therapies might be a good option to treat multi-drug resistant malaria, as well as slow down the emergence and spread of anti-malarial resistance.

Professor Rose McGready recognised by the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

Professor Rose McGready recognised by the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

Posted 20/06/2018

ASTMH nominated Professor Rose McGready, SMRU Deputy Director, as an Honorary International Fellow. Rose received the prestigious award in recognition of outstanding accomplishment by an “individual not an American citizen who has made eminent contributions to some phase of tropical medicine and hygiene”. Rose will formally receive her award at the ASTMH Annual Meeting, to be help 28 Oct-1 Nov in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Meet our researchers - Andrea Ruecker: Blocking malaria transmission

Meet our researchers - Andrea Ruecker: Blocking malaria transmission

Posted 13/06/2018

In the falciparum malaria parasite cycle, the gametocyte stages are responsible for the transmission from person to mosquito, then to other persons. A better understanding of how gametocytes respond to malaria treatments would help us block transmission and ultimately eliminate malaria.

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed with widely used antimalarial drug

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed with widely used antimalarial drug

Posted 13/06/2018

Current recommended treatment regimens for the most widely used medicine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for small children and pregnant women according to a study led by Professor Joel Tarning.

Safety doubts unwarranted, important anti-malarial drug DHA-PPQ is safe to use, study finds

Safety doubts unwarranted, important anti-malarial drug DHA-PPQ is safe to use, study finds

Posted 08/06/2018

8 June Bangkok (Thailand) – One of the world’s most widely used anti-malarial drugs is safe to use, say researchers, after a thorough review and analysis of nearly 200,000 malaria patients who’d taken the drug dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ). There is such a low risk of sudden unexpected death from DHA-PPQ, one of the world’s most effective medicines to treat malaria, that there is no need to limit its current use, the researchers say ...

Meet our researchers - Frank Smithuis: fighting malaria in Myanmar

Meet our researchers - Frank Smithuis: fighting malaria in Myanmar

Posted 06/06/2018

Although malaria is decreasing in Myanmar, resistance to anti-malarials is on the rise in the region and the focus is now to treat people early, particularly in remote communities. MOCRU has set up a network of community health workers, trained and supplied with diagnostics, bednets and treatments, to help improve access to healthcare as well as produce the evidence to encourage policy changes.

Meet our researchers - James Watson: Primaquine and vivax malaria

Meet our researchers - James Watson: Primaquine and vivax malaria

Posted 30/05/2018

Primaquine is a drug used to eliminate vivax malaria from the liver and prevent relapses. However, it causes anaemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. A new, slightly longer regimen with increasing doses of primaquine could allow to safely treat all patients with vivax malaria.

New age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block malaria transmission

New age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block malaria transmission

Posted 25/05/2018

Primaquine can be used to prevent the transmission of falciparum malaria from human to mosquito. Bob Taylor and colleagues developped an age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block the transmission of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

Meet our researchers - Using big data to eliminate malaria

Meet our researchers - Using big data to eliminate malaria

Posted 23/05/2018

Malaria is the most important parasitic infection to still affect humans, and a safe use of antimalarial drugs is paramount. The current explosion of clinical data is causing a jungle of data; making sense of all this data will greatly help us in our fight to eliminate malaria.

Rose McGready awarded Alumni Award for Service to Humanity

Rose McGready awarded Alumni Award for Service to Humanity

Posted 22/05/2018

On 10 May 2018, SMRU Deputy Director Rose McGready was awarded the Alumni Award for Service to Humanity by the University of Sydney. The Alumni Award recognizes the personal contribution of alumni who, through service to philanthropy, improve the lives of those in need. It also seeks to recognize the significant involvement of Sydney alumni in projects that enrich local or international communities. In in her acceptance speech, Rose thanked the ...